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Social Science: Politics, History, and Economics

Course Descriptions: World History, US History, Political Science, and Economics 

Course_Descriptions:_World_History,_US_History,_Political_Science,_and_Economics  icon
Course Descriptions: World History, US History, Political Science, and Economics 
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Modern European History
Course Description: European contact with other regions of the world changed history. We will trace the rise of democratic ideas starting in Greece and Rome and end with struggles for Democracy in the Modern World.
Topics-Italian Renaissance, Reformation, Muslim World, Safavid Empire, European Exploration, China and the Europeans, Japanese Isolationism, Fake News, Spain, Europe in North America, Columbian Exchange, Marching towards WWI and WWII
Spring Semester - World Studies
Course Description: We live in a global society and have regular contact with people from other parts of the world. Successful workers and citizens will be able to interact with others from a place of respect and understanding. We will study different regions and will develop an understanding for the geographic, cultural, religious and political differences and similarities to ourselves. Our increased awareness will help deepen our connections in our class, school, local and world communities.
Topics – Global Data, Africa, India, Korea, China, Oceania, Middle East and Latin America.
WORK will consist of Vocabulary, Research on selected topics, Reading chunks of the text for understanding, Small group presentations and discussions, Reflection writing on issues and concepts, Watching short Video Clips and Analyzing Charts and Graphs.
 
United States History and Geography: Continuity and Change in the Twentieth Century
 Students in grade eleven study the major turning points in American history in the twentieth century. Following a review of the nation's beginnings and the impact of the Enlightenment on U.S. democratic ideals, students build upon the tenth grade study of global industrialization to understand the emergence and impact of new technology and a corporate economy, including the social and cultural effects. They trace the change in the ethnic composition of American society; the movement toward equal rights for racial minorities and women; and the role of the United States as a major world power. An emphasis is placed on the expanding role of the federal government and federal courts as well as the continuing tension between the individual and the state. Students consider the major social problems of our time and trace their causes in historical events. They learn that the United States has served as a model for other nations and that the rights and freedoms we enjoy are not accidents, but the results of a defined set of political principles that are not always basic to citizens of other countries. Students understand that our rights under the U.S. Constitution are a precious inheritance that depends on an educated citizenry for their preservation and protection.
 
Principles of American Democracy 
Students in grade twelve pursue a deeper understanding of the institutions of American government. They compare systems of government in the world today and analyze the history and changing interpretations of the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the current state of the legislative, executive, and judiciary branches of government. An emphasis is placed on analyzing the relationship among federal, state, and local governments, with particular attention paid to important historical documents such as the Federalist Papers. These standards represent the culmination of civic literacy as students prepare to vote, participate in community activities, and assume the responsibilities of citizenship. 
 
Economics
Why Economics? We will study a set of reasoning and decision-making skills for surviving in a global economy and how the concepts of scarcity influence our government and personal lives. We will confront the issues of increasing personal bankruptcies, credit card debt and the value of saving and how to be a smart consumer, how to choose a top earning college degree in a market that is stable or growing. Finally we will look at international trade and how it impacts us here in the US.
Topics: 
Intro, Trade-offs, Economic Systems, American Economy, Goals of a Nation, Income Gap, Consumption, Buying Principles, Consumerism, Credit, Loans, Government Regulation, Student Loans, Food, Clothing, Rent vs. Buy, Purchasing Vehicles, Starting a Business, Trade with other Nations, and Obstacles to Growth.
WORK will consist of Vocabulary, Research on selected topics, Reading chunks of the text for understanding, Small group presentations and discussions, Reflection writing on issues and concepts, Watching short Video Clips and Analyzing Charts and Graphs.
 
 
Email: jaross@seq.org     
Phone Ext. 77369     
Room: 5    
 
 
Email: klee@seq.org        
Phone Ext. 77319        
Room: 10